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  1. 1. A true shapes of continents and oceans 2. 1569. 3. “Mercator projection,”4. legend 5. Locator globe 6.The Robinson projection. 7. The scale bar 8. There is distortion in most sizes. 9.absolute location 10. Directions are not very accurate

    Explanation:

  2. A?

    Step-by-step explanation:

    If the square was split into 3 rectangles the 3 rectangles sum up to the square.

  3. 1. Photo description: A picture of the Eiffel tower, to be stuck on a mat.
    Dimensions (including units): 4 in x 6 in
    2. Since 2x would be added to each dimension:
    Length: 6 + 2x (inches)
    Width: 4 + 2x (inches)
    3. Area: A = LW = (6+2x)(4+2x) square inches
    4. F: (6)(4) = 24, O: (6)(2x) = 12x, I: (2x)(4) = 8x, L: (2x)(2x) = 4x^2
    Polynomial expression: Adding the FOIL terms up: 4x^2 + 20x + 24
    5. The area should be in square inches, since we multiplied length (in inches) by width (in inches).
    6. Multiply factors using the distribution method:
    (6+2x)(4+2x) = 6(4+2x) + 2x(4+2x) = 24 + 12x + 8x + 4x^2 = 24 + 20x + 4x^2
    This is identical to the expression in Part 4.
    7. x: 24 + 20x + 4x^2
    If x = 1.0 in: Area = 24 + 20(1) + 4(1)^2 = 48 in^2
    If x = 2.0 in: Area = 24 + 20(2) + 4(2)^2 = 80 in^2
    8. If a white mat costs $0.03 per square inch and a black mat costs $0.05 per square inch, determine the cost of each size of black and white mat.
    x Total area of matCost of white matCost of black mat
    1.0 in, A = 48 in^2, (0.03)(48) = $1.44, (0.05)(48) = $2.40
    2.0 in, A = 80 in^2, (0.03)(80) = $2.40, (0.05)(80) = $4.00
    9. The cheapest option would be the white mat with 1-in margins on all sides, which would cost $1.44. Without any further criteria on aesthetics or size limitations, this is the most viable option.

  4. Question 1 & 2. Image 1. All the high or low pressure areas are marked. Standard atmospheric pressure is 1,013.25 millibars. Everything above is high pressure and everything below is low pressure.  

    Question 3. Low pressure areas. These areas are basically storms. As hurricanes and blizzard are classified as storms, one expects snow or rain in areas with low atmospheric pressure.  

    Question 4. High pressure areas. These areas are associated with light winds and the phenomenon known as subscidence. Through adiabatic or compressional heating the air mass is ”dried out”. This is known as subscidence.  

    Question 5 & 6. Image 2. Northern Hemisphere: high pressure – clockwise direction, low pressure – counterclockwise

    Question 7. As winds move in an anticlockwise manner around a low-pressure area, currently, the wind will blow from a southwestern to northeastern direction. However, as soon as the low-pressure area moves in, the wind will blow from a southeastern to a northwestern direction.  

    Question 8. As winds move in a clockwise manner around a low-pressure area, currently, the wind will blow from a southeastern to a northwestern direction. However, as soon as the high-pressure area moves in, the wind will blow from a southwestern to northeastern direction.  

    Question 9. Image 3. Strong winds are indicated by closely packed isobars as they indicate a steep horizontal pressure gradient.  

    [tex]***kinda need this in under 24hours** add the data to the isobar map and use that data to answer th[/tex]
    [tex]***kinda need this in under 24hours** add the data to the isobar map and use that data to answer th[/tex]
    [tex]***kinda need this in under 24hours** add the data to the isobar map and use that data to answer th[/tex]

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